Non-Hazardous Waste Recycling

A

lthough non-hazardous wastes by definition do not appear to pose a threat, such wastes can cause significant environmental damage. For this reason, state and local governments often regulate non-hazardous waste, and it is important to properly dispose of your waste to make sure you meet all appropriate regulations.

Non-Hazardous Waste Recycling;

For this reason, state and local governments often regulate non-hazardous waste, and it is important to properly dispose of your waste to make sure you meet all appropriate regulations. Non-hazardous wastes can be generated especially during the production of goods and products in the industrial sector. Examples include electrical power generation and the production of materials such as pulp and paper, iron and steel, glass and concrete, according to the EU Environmental Protection Agency (eea.europa.eu/tr). One country may identify some type of waste as non-hazardous, while another may describe it as dangerous.

 

 

 

If your company produces non-hazardous waste, it may be tempting to throw the waste into your nearest bin. However, doing so can get your company in trouble and lead to high fines for improper disposal. Knowing the correct course of action largely depends on knowing non-hazardous waste, how to identify your waste and how to properly dispose of it. Below are some examples of non-hazardous industrial wastes and what you need to know as a business generating such wastes:

  • Common Industrial Materials (ash, sludge, grinding Powders etc.)
  • Medical Facility Waste (Plastic packaging, office products, paper etc.)
  • E-Wastes (Gold, copper, aluminum etc. used in computer parts)
  • Secondary Materials (Waste dump sand, post-construction waste etc.)

According to the World Health Organization, "Approximately 85% of the waste produced by health activities is non-hazardous."

WHO